An Anatomical Theater With Chopped Chicken Liver On Toast (Part 2 Of A Meal)

I’m teaching a class this Spring semester called The Anatomical Theater. On Tuesdays we’ll discuss Western Art, the Classical Age, and the finer points of beauty and ugliness (thank you Bottichelli and Metsys); then, on Thursdays we’ll view the human body cut open, organs removed and replaced, invisible stitches making all whole again. Once and … Continue reading An Anatomical Theater With Chopped Chicken Liver On Toast (Part 2 Of A Meal)

The Philosophy of Polenta as I Whisk with Napoléon, Rousseau, Sebald and Aurelius.

I’m pausing in my reconstruction of Thanksgiving in order to get all philosophical about cooking with corn meal.  Here is part of what the Larousse Gastronomique has to say about polenta: Piedmont form of maize (corn) meal porridge.  It is made simply of maize flour dried in the open and not in the oven.  Polenta … Continue reading The Philosophy of Polenta as I Whisk with Napoléon, Rousseau, Sebald and Aurelius.

A Short History Of One Meal With Help From The Pixies And Charles Baudelaire

Le Larousse Gastronomique vous regarde.  Le Larousse Gastronomique interroge votre cuisine.  You’re pretty sure it’s smirking but you go on. Frankly, you have your doubts about the Culinary Institute of America’s The Professional Chef . . . does it laugh behind your back?  What do you do? What do I do?  I’ll listen to the Pixies. … Continue reading A Short History Of One Meal With Help From The Pixies And Charles Baudelaire

Aaron Needs A Goat–I Have A Stew To Cook, Sins To Confess, And Côtes du Rhône To Drink. Let’s Here It For Family Bovidae!!

What’s in a cooking pot?  Here’s Rachel Laudan in Cuisines and Empires on the subject: The cooking pot, in which diverse elements were brought into harmony, symbolized culture and state.  When the Greeks founded a new colony, they carried a cauldron and a spark of fire from the mother city.  Confucians argued that the king … Continue reading Aaron Needs A Goat–I Have A Stew To Cook, Sins To Confess, And Côtes du Rhône To Drink. Let’s Here It For Family Bovidae!!

Beef Bone-Marrow: Removing Excess Blood, Scooping The Marrow Out, A Single Light, 350 Degrees For 20 Minutes, And An Egg.

Up above an appropriate memento mori from Pieter Claesz (1628).  Below, my beaten-up copy of Larousse Gastronomique under BONE-MARROW (Moelle) lists seven recipes: Beef bone-marrow (Moelle de boeuf).  The marrow, cut into fairly thick slices (using a knife dipped in boiling water), poached without boiling in salt water and drained, is used to garnish steaks.  Bone-marrow … Continue reading Beef Bone-Marrow: Removing Excess Blood, Scooping The Marrow Out, A Single Light, 350 Degrees For 20 Minutes, And An Egg.